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Father and son inspire Richmond through their art

RICHMOND, Va. -- For artist Jeromyah Jones, each brush stroke is like a spiritual journey.

"I’ve been painting all of my life. Ever since I was three years old," Jones said. "I first use my imagination after I have the inspiration.”

The meaning of his paintings go much deeper than any layer of paint.

"It goes beyond the principles and elements of design. It teaches life lessons," he said. "So everything our creator made. That is the art. I’m just painting the reflection. So you can call these reflections."

Jeromyah Jones

After thousands of portraits and landscapes, he is still honing his skills.

"It is a combination of the Italian renaissance and the Harlem renaissance," he said.

For guidance he looks to his mentor, a tutor who also happens to be Jeromyah's dad, Jerome Jones, Jr.

Jerome Jones

"He taught me to be creative in everything I do and be passionate in doing it,” Jeromyah said.

Jerome's illustrious career spans decades. The VCU graduate has painted and rubbed shoulders with countless celebrities like BB King, Peabo Bryson, Natalie Cole. Ray Charles, Muhammad Ali, and Stevie Wonder.

But nothing has meant more to him than sharing a love of art with his greatest work of art.

Jerome and Jeromyah Jones

"It is an honor and a joy being able to raise him and to be in his life," Jerome said. "The father and son bond is just, I love it. Like I said living our visions every day."

The father and son team paint separately, but share a similar view of the higher power of art.

"Every day I wake up I am excited to see what the heavenly father will reveal to us," Jerome said.

"I think he is one of the best because he is versatile. He doesn’t paint just one thing," Jeromyah added.

The Jones' artwork hangs in several stores downtown like Waller’s Jewelers, The Elegba Folklore Society and Supreme Hairstyling Lounge.

Supreme's owner Clarence Oliver, Jr said the Jones' rotating works inspired customers and barbers alike.

"It might be landscape themes. It might be abstract themes," Oliver said. "I want the walls to be alive. I want them to be moving."

Jerome and Jeromyah Jones are a dynamic duo whose creations are brightening Richmond and beyond one painting at a time.

"We believe every place we go is our gallery," Jeromyah said. "Life is our studio. And the world is our museum."

If you would see Jerome and Jeromyah Jones’ works of art in person, the father and son are displaying paintings in a show called Memories of the Motherland at Elegba Folklore Society through July 31st. There will be a meet and greet on July 7.

If you know of someone I should feature in my “I Have a Story” segment email me at gmcquade@wtvr.com.