Elaborate Hoax: No, Joel Osteen has not renounced his faith

Joel Osteen, televangelist

Joel Osteen, televangelist

Washington (CNN) — Washington (CNN) – Joel Osteen, the popular megachurch pastor from Houston, is the target of an Internet hoax that falsely reported the Christian leader was leaving his church and renouncing his faith.

On a website designed to mimic Osteen’s official website, the pranksters posted “A special message from Pastor Joel.” The post describes the Bible as “a fallible, flawed, highly inconsistent history book that has been altered hundreds of times” and announces that Osteen plans to leave his Lakewood Church.

Osteen and church staff labeled the website a fraud and said the idea that he was leaving the faith was a “false rumor.”

According to the website’s registration, Lucas Skass with BMG Enterprises LLC, who lists his residence in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, purchased the domain name on April 1 of this year — April Fools Day.

Calls to the number listed for Skass, as well as people associated with BMG Enterprises LLC, have gone unanswered.

“I am leaving the Christian faith,” says a big banner near the top of the page.

In addition to the announcement, the website posted a fake screenshot of CNN.com that included a falsified headline about Osteen’s supposed decision. The pranksters also launched an associated Twitter account that has since been suspended.

The website — http://www.joelostenministries.com/ — spells Osteen‘s name wrong and comes with an elaborate disclaimer.

“This site is the property of Pastor Joel Osten and Joel Osten Ministries. It bears no relation to ‘Joel Osteen’ or ‘Lakewood Church,'” the disclaimer reads. “Any implication or relation to ‘Joel Osteen’ and the ‘Lakewood Church’ is purely coincidental. ‘Joel Osteen’ is not in any way involved or related to this site and references to ‘Joel Osteen’ are, again, entirely coincidental.”

In an interview with ABC News, Osteen dismissed the prank.

“You know, I’m really not angry. I don’t feel like a victim,” Osteen said. “I feel too blessed, that life is too short to let things like this get you down.”

He continued: “You can’t stop everything from happening, but you can choose to say, ‘God, it’s in your hands.’ I’m going to move forward. I’m going stay full of joy and I’m going to enjoy this day.”

A spokesman for Osteen told CNN that he and the church are not planning any legal action at the moment.

Though Osteen dismissed the hoax, many on Twitter fell for it and were shocked by the announcement.

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