An anonymous donor asked a hospital where it needed help and gave $25 million to make it happen

Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles will now be able to help many more kids, thanks to an anonymous $25 million gift.

It is one of the single largest donations in the hospital’s history, according to President and CEO Paul Viviano.

“This truly transformative gift comes at a time when demand is growing quickly — particularly among underserved children in Southern California — both for pediatric neurological care as well as interventional radiology’s broad range of minimally invasive procedures,” Viviano said in a statement.

Part of the $25 million will go toward creating a multidisciplinary Neurological Institute Outpatient Center.

The hospital has seen a growing need for pediatric neurological care over the years, Viviano told CNN. He hopes that the new outpatient center will be open by 2022 and that by that time, the hospital will be able to care for as many as 31,000 neurological patients.

This outpatient center will house all the team members involved in managing neurological disorders under one roof, one of only a few in the nation. This includes neurologists, neurosurgeons and social workers.

The money will also be used to improve the hospital’s interventional radiology through the purchase of technology and an overhaul of treatment and diagnosis space.

“We want to be completely respectful of the donor’s wishes to remain anonymous so we are not releasing any personal details,” Viviano wrote in an email. “The donor came to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles asking us what our greatest needs are, and when we presented both the Neurological Institute Outpatient Center construction work and Interventional Radiology enhancements as priority projects, the donor was very happy to support these endeavors.

“Not only is this tremendous gift going to help our doctors and other experts provide more care for more children with neurological disorders, the interventional radiology improvements will expand the hospital’s ability to help patients with many other pediatric conditions and illnesses as well,” he said.

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