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Midlothian Village sold; new owners promise ‘long-waited improvements’

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RICHMOND, Va. – An apartment complex in South Richmond that is federally subsidized will soon have new ownership and possibly new and improved conditions.

For months the CBS 6 ProblemS have reported on the unsafe living conditions at the former Midlothian Village. The complex was just sold by New Jersey-based Tryko Partners, to a company that plan to rename the complex “The Belt Atlantic.”

The company that bought it plans to do major renovations, but the first step will be changing the sign out front.

"It is fairly quick, but it was much needed,” said Cheyanne Williams, The Belt Atlantic Apartments. "It is going to be a long-awaited improvement for the residents."

She said a $9.7 million renovation is planned for the 1971-built complex.

"New flooring, cabinets, counter tops, lighting, brand new energy star appliances, new heating and AC Units,” said Williams.

Those improvements are welcomed by residents.

Ceiling at Midlothian Village

"Yea, I'm looking forward to them, hopefully it's good change, hopefully,” said resident Ketwan McQuinn.

"Yea, hopefully they will be, I'm looking for to them,” said Tiara Conover, another resident.

The CBS 6 Problem Solvers have investigated issues at the complex since last year. In January, we led Congressman Donald McEachin on a tour, during which he called the conditions unsafe, unhealthy, and unconscionable.

"To be forced to live in conditions like this, this young lady has to pay an electric bill that has now tripled because these folks won't come fix the heat. It's not right. It's not the way you treat people," McEachin said.

The apartment complex, with 216 units, was last remodeled in 2002. Changes are planned inside and outside, including an increase in cameras for safety.

"It is going to be more secure, there are still some examples of existing gaps in our wrought iron fence that are going to be closed off, we're actually going to have fencing here at the entrances, just to keep the people out that don't belong here or the people that start any problems,” she said.

Those who live nearby believe the changes will not only benefit those who live here, but the neighborhood as well...

"I think it will look good for the neighborhood and I think it's a good investment for the neighbors around them,” said Michael Fletcher.

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