Investigation underway after man killed in Henrico

Grandmother leads Women’s March in Richmond: ‘I’m so proud of us’

RICHMOND, Va. -- A grandmother credited a grassroots campaign for helping attract thousands to walk along the streets of Carytown during  a day of worldwide protests.

Mary Leffler helped organize the Women's March RVA a year after women took to the streets in droves to protest President Donald Trump's inauguration.

"I just made a few phone calls, set a location and then started spreading the word," Leffler explained. "I'm a grandma. That’s my most important role."

This second year of the Women’s March also comes in the middle of the #MeToo movement, which has shed light on sexual misconduct and ushered in social change in a wide bevy of industries.

The event also marks months ahead of the midterm elections in the United States, in which progressive women hope to turn their activism into victories at the ballot box.

The men, women and their families gathered at the old Martin's parking lot on West Cary Street Saturday morning to sing songs and talk prior to the march.

"Sister marches are happening all over the country and Richmond had such a great show. I'm so proud of us," Leffler said.

Kelley Robinson, Planned Parenthood’s national organizing director, told CNN that it’s “nothing new for women to be involved in elections,” but said that many women who marched last year had been spurred to run for office themselves.

Organizers of Richmond's march estimated that about 3,500 people showed up.

The Commonwealth's newly sworn-in Governor Ralph Northam led a portion of the march donning a pink knitted hat.

Leffler remarked, "He’s a good guy."