Megachurch hoping to get in on Scott’s Addition

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Hope Midtown has been meeting at Thomas Jefferson High School since forming a year and a half ago. (Courtesy Micah Voraritskul)

RICHMOND, Va. — Scott’s Addition’s popularity is extending to the pulpit.

As the fast-transitioning neighborhood continues to lure young professionals, Goochland-based Hope Church is likewise looking at Scott’s Addition to better reach that demographic and find a permanent home for its fledgling Hope Midtown congregation.

The 20-year-old church near West Creek Business Park launched Hope Midtown, an urban offshoot, about 18 months ago. It has been looking for a permanent home for the group, which meets Sunday mornings at Thomas Jefferson High School, just west of Scott’s Addition.

Pastor Micah Voraritskul, who leads Hope Midtown’s Sunday services and community outreach, said the search resulted from the church’s decision to branch out with a physical presence in the city–as opposed to expanding its Goochland campus, where it recently added a building and expanded its children’s wing.

“Our West Creek campus was at five services on a weekend, and we were facing this decision of, are we going to build a larger auditorium out on the Goochland County line, or do we want to fulfill our original vision as a church, which was to be a movement in our city that engaged people of all demographics, of all socioeconomic strata,” Voraritskul said.

“Scott’s Addition represents the area of the city that really is happening right now, in terms of the demographics of people that I think a lot of churches are missing. People between the ages of 19 and 35, the church is missing them in a huge way,” he said.

The church is conducting its search with Kyle Burns of NAI Eagle. Burns, who attends Hope Church, said they’ve stepped up that search in the past six months.

“We’ve identified a handful of sites that would work and are really just finalizing what the requirements really are,” Burns said. “It’s kind of a moving target as to what facility the church would fit in and matching up with the environment we’re trying to reach.”

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