Police arrest man accused of burning car, woman still missing

UPDATE: Road closures along 5-mile stretch of Broad St. postponed

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A GRTC representative said Thursday that the rolling closures had been postponed and they didn’t know when the closures would resume.

RICHMOND, Va. — The city announced Wednesday evening that rolling closures will take place over a 4.7 mile stretch of Broad Street beginning Friday, June 17 and will remain closed until Monday, June 20.

The rolling lane closures will start at 9 a.m. on Friday and end at 4 p.m. on Monday, according to the city, though no other information was given to clarify which parts might be affected on what days.

Both east and westbound lanes of Broad Street will be closed from Staples Mill Road to 14th Street during the process.

With multiple graduations slated at the Siegel Center, it is likely the city will work around the VCU area.

In addition, Main Street will be closed from 14th Street to Orleans Street.

Detours will be in place and signs posted for the rolling closures.

The city said only that the closures are due to soil testing for the Bus Rapid Transit project.

The $49 million dollar project will transform Broad Street into a 7-mile stretch of frequently running buses, stretching from Willow Lawn to Rocket’s Landing.

The $49 million dollar project will transform Broad Street into a 7-mile stretch of frequently running buses, stretching from Willow Lawn to Rocket’s Landing.

 

The project, nicknamed Pulse, will transform Broad Street into a seven-mile stretch of frequently running buses, stretching from Willow Lawn to Rocketts Landing. City Council approved the $49 million dollar project in February.

The plan includes 14 station locations and three and a half miles dedicated to bus-only lanes.

The  February vote came after seven years of planning and intense debate. While the project has already been approved by the city’s Planning Commission and Urban Design Committee, there had been several hurdles and concerns that divided the community and city leaders.