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California bars schools from using “Redskins” nickname

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California public schools will be barred from using the Redskins name for sports teams and mascots after legislation was signed by California Governor Jerry Brown.

Starting January 1, 2017, all California public schools will be barred from using the term “Redskin,” as many Native Americans consider it an insensitive racial slur.

California is the first state to pass legislation restricting the use of “Redskins” in its schools statewide.

According to CBS News, only four schools in California still have teams or mascots called the Redskins.

The grassroots Change the Mascot campaign, which has been opponent of the nickname said in a statement:

“We applaud and extend our deepest gratitude to AB-30 author Assemblyman Luis Alejo, Governor Jerry Brown, and California’s lawmakers for standing on the right side of history by bringing an end to the use of the demeaning and damaging R-word slur in the state’s schools. They have set a shining example for other states across the country, and for the next generation, by demonstrating a commitment to the American ideals of inclusion and mutual respect.”

“Their historic step to build a better future stands in stark contrast to the dogged inaction of Washington’s NFL team, which in the face of all the evidence that this term degrades and offends Native Americans, continues to defend and promote the slur for its own financial gain.”

This summer a federal judge ruled to cancel the Washington Redskins’ trademarks, stating that the logo might denigrate Native Americans. The cancellation will not officially take place until the team has exhausted all appeals in the Federal Courts.