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CHESTERFIELD COUNTY, Va. -- Some recollections never fade. The events of a tumultuous day 54 years ago struck a nerve with a nine-year-old Frank Badalson.

"I have a distinct memory of the whole weekend and we watched to whole thing non-stop," Frank said. "I got home to rather upset family."

A young president, with so much promise, cut down in Dallas.

"It was a sad day no question," Frank recalled.

President John F. Kennedy's assassination would grip Badalson. A grip that has not let go.

"It gives me a lump in my throat. And I’ve watched this many times," Frank said.

Initially, like so many skeptical Americans, Frank was convinced the Kennedy assassination was part of a larger conspiracy.

The Cubans, the Russians, or the Mafia must be responsible.

No way could Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone when he pulled the trigger.

"You keep anything under wraps and people wonder why," Frank said. "We’ve got the guy in the sewer. We’ve got the guy on the Grassy Knoll. We’ve got the guy or guys on the triple overpass."

But the former Chesterfield police officer started pouring over the evidence. He would read account after account. Slowly, he changed course.

Frank now believes only one man was responsible.

"Complete 180," Frank said. "It is hard for people to believe that a 24-year-old nobody pulled this off."

Over the years Frank has amassed dozens of artifacts and hundreds of documents related to the assassination.

"I wanted to have the exact ammunition that was used by Lee Harvey Oswald," Frank said.

Frank’s collection includes everything from original photos taken by investigators to authentic news bulletins once owned by JFK's personal secretary Evelyn Lincoln.

"It says 'Flash. Dallas. Kennedy appears seriously wounded. Perhaps fatally,'" Frank said.

But Frank’s most prized possession sits in his garage. A rusted 1955 Bel Air was once owned by Ruth Paine.

"It is history for me. It makes me feel closer," he said. "Lee Harvey Oswald started to learn to drive in this vehicle. He was taught by Ruth Paine."

Frank refuses to restore the car. He said he believed there was historic value in leaving the vehicle as is.

"This car on several occasions transported the rifle that killed President Kennedy," Frank said.

Frank’s station wagon remains a tangible link to that fateful day.

"He sat in this seat. He grabbed this steering wheel. And he turned this ignition switch. And he drove this car," Frank said.

More than 50 later, Kennedy’s assassination still commands attention.

"This is a murder and in a way it is a simple murder case," Frank said.

The thousands of newly released documents by the National Archives has piqued Frank’s interest. But Frank will forever remain convinced one person pulled the trigger.

"There is not going to be a smoking gun here," Frank said. "As you know people don’t accept that. They think there was something involved."

While Frank said he believed conspiracy theories swirling around JFK’s killing will never cease, he added if only people would methodically study the case they would find the answer hidden in plain sight.

"I don’t think I will have to eat my words. I’ll stand by that," Frank said. "There is no question that the physical evidence speaks for itself. And Lee Harvey Oswald committed the crime alone."

Watch CBS 6 News at 11 p.m. Fridays for Greg McQuade’s “I Have A Story” reports. If you know of someone Greg should feature in my “I Have A Story” segment email him at gmcquade@wtvr.com.

Watch "I Have A Story" Fridays on CBS 6 News at 11 p.m. If you know of someone with an interesting story we should tell, email gmcquade@wtvr.com