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Real-life ‘Breaking Bad’ teacher pleads guilty to making meth

John W. Gose, 56, was arrested last October during a traffic stop in New Mexico.

Walter White would be impressed.

A New Mexico high school chemistry teacher pleaded guilty earlier this week to producing methamphetamines.

John W. Gose pleaded guilty to four counts: two counts of trafficking by manufacturing and once count each of possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia, according to CNN affiliate KVIA.

“That the defendant in this case chose to plead guilty to all of the charges is a testament to the strength of the investigation,” Doña Ana County District Attorney Mark D’Antonio said. “Thanks to the hard work of the Las Cruces Police Department, the New Mexico State Police and the prosecutors in this office, we are able to close the books on this case of life imitating art while saving the taxpayers of New Mexico the cost of a jury trial.”

Gose, 56, taught chemistry, science and vocational training at high schools and middle schools in Las Cruces, New Mexico, and El Paso, Texas.

He was arrested last October during a traffic stop in Las Cruces. Police found a white styrofoam ice chest with all of the tools of the trade needed to make meth: glassware, rubber tubing and chemicals.

A later search of property Gose owns turned up enough chemicals to make about a pound of meth, worth more than $40,000 on the street.

Life imitates art

Walter White (Bryan Cranston) teaching chemistry in “Breaking Bad.”

Walter White, of course, is the character made famous by actor Bryan Cranston in the hit TV show “Breaking Bad,” which ran on AMC for five season from 2008 to 2013 to big ratings and critical acclaim.

The similarities between the show and the real-life case are striking — same state (New Mexico), same type of defendant (middle-aged man), same profession (chemistry teacher), same crime (making meth). Gose even has a mustache, just like White.

The judge in the case ordered Gose to undergo a 60-day diagnostic evaluation before he’s sentenced.