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Big rig billboard along Richmond interstate goes digital

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The structure was erected in 2004 beside I-95 northbound. (Courtesy Motley’s)

The structure was erected in 2004 beside I-95 northbound. (Courtesy Motley’s)

RICHMOND, Va. — As if a tractor-trailer perched atop steel pylons wasn’t enough of an eye-catcher, the local auction house it advertises along Interstate 95 has added more reason for travelers to turn their heads.

Motley’s Asset Disposition Group recently installed a digital billboard-style sign to the sides of the 18-wheeler that towers above its corporate headquarters and auction complex along the interstate south of Richmond. The new sign is advertising auctions and displaying animated messages for holidays and events.

President Mark Motley said the sign was a given for a structure that’s been catching eyes since it was erected in 2004.

“We’re in the marketing business. We market and advertise a variety of assets for our clients, and we felt this would really give us an opportunity to promote that to the highest extent with 100,000 vehicles driving by each day,” Motley said. “We thought it was a great opportunity to try to seize that moment.”

While a billboard in style, Motley said the sign would be used only for promotional use and not leased out for advertisements for other companies.

The red tractor-trailer, complete with illuminated headlights, stands out among the billboards that line I-95 northbound. The truck was originally among the various items at Motley’s auctions at its complex at 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road. It previously displayed a fixed sign for the company, whose auctions range from vehicles to industrial equipment and real estate.

“A lot of people don’t think it’s a real truck,” Motley said. “We actually drove that truck to the site, and then we started taking the parts out and reducing the weight of it. But it was a drivable, workable truck.”

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