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Who contributed most to Mayor-Elect Levar Stoney’s campaign

RICHMOND, Va - As the Mayor-Elect Levar Stoney continues his transition into the top job at city hall, CBS 6 took a look at some of the donors who contributed to his campaign.

According to the Virginia Public Access Project (VPAP), Stoney raised $842,980.  His top three contributors come from very different backgrounds.  The Home Builders Association of Virginia, who endorsed Stoney, contributed $23,000 (a $10,000 donation was also provided by Housing RVA PAC), the political action fund formed by Governor Terry McAuliffe contributed $20,540, and the former CEO of Owens and Minor contributed $20,100, according to VPAP.

The Home Builders Association of Virginia, who endorsed Stoney, contributed $23,000, the political action fund formed by Governor Terry McAuliffe contributed $20,540, and the former CEO of Owens and Minor contributed $20,100, according to VPAP.

Looking at donations by industry, construction and real estate professionals contributed nearly 20 percent of the total donations made to Stoney's campaign.  Sources close to Stoney said they believe the endorsement of the Home Builders Association likely spurred other professionals to donate.

You can see a complete breakdown of campaign contributions to each candidate in the Richmond mayor's race by clicking here.

When asked to comment on the donors who contributed to his side during the campaign, a spokesperson directed CBS 6 to a statement Stoney made on the campaign trail, in which he said that he is "beholden to no one but the people of Richmond."

CBS 6 political analyst Dr. Bob Holsworth said the only thing that surprised him about Stoney's donors was that a lot of money came from outside the city of Richmond.

In recent years, Stoney served as the Executive Director of the Democratic Party of Virginia and as Secretary of the Commonwealth under McAuliffe.  Holsworth said the connections he made in those roles likely lead to donations from wealthy, democratic donors who live outside of Richmond.

"I think a number of those people might not have a major interest in the city of Richmond. They just wanted to support someone they thought was a really good guy," said Dr. Holsworth.

Holsworth added that Stoney, who is 35 years old, likely has political ambitions outside of his time in Richmond, so Holsworth said Stoney will likely avoid giving the impression that donors influenced his decision-making as mayor.

Richmond voter Michael Holcomb said he did not vote for Stoney but that he will give him a chance.  Holcomb said he feels the current administration paid too much attention to the business community and left the residents behind.

"We don't want the mayor answering to corporate," Holcomb said.  "[I would] like to see him (Stoney) do something for the community. Like to see him do something for City Hall and the workers."

A lot of money was raised during the mayoral race, but a lot of cash was spent too.  In total, the seven final candidates spent $1,744,982 during the course of the campaign.